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Volunteers


Pet Therapy - Love on a Leash

Patches Pat Pet Therapy JourneyCareMy name is Colleen and this is my buddy Patches. We have the privilege of visiting JourneyCare’s Marshak Family Hospice CareCenter in Glenview as pet therapy dogs. We try to provide some comfort, companionship, physical contact and stress relief for patients, their families and visitors. In fact, did you know that by giving patients and families something to look forward to, our visits can help improve their quality of life?

Make a Resolution to Bring Comfort to Others

Make a Resolution to Bring Comfort to Others

Looking to start 2018 off right? Become a JourneyCare volunteer!

Did you know Medicare requires that 5% of all patient care hours be provided by volunteers? JourneyCare is seeking volunteers to support patients, families, and staff so that, together, we can enrich lives through expert and compassionate care. Volunteers are an essential part of our team’s success!

It’s The Little Things

It’s The Little Things

A nurse by trade long retired, I missed that special contact caregivers have with their patients. So when I heard of JourneyCare’s CNA Assist program  ̶  to partner closely with certified nursing assistants to care for hospice patients  ̶  I signed up immediately. From my very first shadow shift, I knew I had made the right choice.

I have the privilege of comforting patients with my presence, my skills and the assistance of a supportive staff from whom I learn something new every time I volunteer.

Linda Kielas, RN, Volunteer

Linda Kielas, RN, Volunteer

This year Linda celebrates 50 years as a registered nurse. Retired from active practice, Linda has since acquired two certifications in Emergency Management and maintains her CPR instructor status teaching the staff at Northwest Community Hospital. Linda also sits on the JourneyCare Volunteer Advisory Council, represents the volunteer department at the Amber IDT and serves as camp nurse for Camp Courage.

Rick Davis, Veteran Volunteer

Rick Davis is a graduate of Purdue University who has lived in Evanston for 40 years. He is a retired Registered Representative who worked in financial services. Davis served four years in the Marine Corps, including two tours in the Vietnam War. He is married to his high school sweetheart and they have been together more than 50 years. Some of his past volunteer work includes participation in the National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum's educational outreach program. Here he shared with high school and college students of American history what it was like to be in a combat zone in Vietnam as a 20-year-old – a talk he has given to more than 25,000 people. He is a contributor to the book “Once a Marine” by Claude DeShazo, a collection of stories by veterans about how their Marine Corps experience impacted their lives.

In addition to his volunteer work at the National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum, Davis has been a civic volunteer for Heifer International, promoting the humanitarian work of this nonprofit organization. He led discussion groups for the Northwest Earth Institute, educating others on issues surrounding the environment. He has also been a  supporter of America Saves, a campaign to encourage people to return to those long forgotten habits of frugality, thrift, moderation, self-discipline, delayed gratification and patience. He has also volunteered at the Presbyterian Retirement Home in Evanston, as well as Hillside Food Pantry.

Rick and his wife, Sheila, have traveled to more than 20 countries. They have hiked the Grand Canyon, the Rocky Mountains, Pyrenees, Andes and Himalayas. They have seen the King of Bhutan and King of Cambodia. The duo has traveled up the Mekong Delta to Angkor Wat, sailed up the Nile in Egypt, hiked the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu and hiked through Tuscany, and explored Patagonia. A  highlight of their travels was climbing Mt. Killimanjaro and then experiencing an African safari on the Serengeti.

 

 

Proud To Be a Veteran and Volunteer

As a Marine veteran who served two tours of duty in the Vietnam War, I’m well-aware of the sacrifices our men and women make to serve their country in the armed forces. And as a hospice volunteer who works primarily with veterans, I’m able to express my gratitude to veterans for their service in multiple ways.

Time visiting with a veteran and his or her family  ̶  the sharing of stories and experiences  ̶  are some of the most precious moments in my life. The Marine Corps motto is Semper Fi, meaning always faithful to God, country, and your fellow marine. Well, JourneyCare's volunteer program enables me to carry out that mission not only to other marines but to all veterans.

The End of Life as a Life Lesson

The End of Life as a Life Lesson

My beloved late husband, who died November 11, 2014, was in the care of JourneyCare in our home for the last four days of his life. Coming from Serbia, neither one of us knew much about this health service, except that we were both scared by the word “hospice!” We associated it with the end of life and we were both horrified.

“Please don’t mention the word hospice,” I begged a social worker, who later helped both of us a great deal. “No worries, nobody likes that word,” she told me with a hug like a sister, and sympathy deep in her eyes.

Mini Horses Provide Big Comfort to Hospice Patients

Hospice therapy pets, like the sweet miniature therapy horses that visit our Hospice CareCenters, bring love, laughter and comforting companionship to those on the end-of-life journey. Visits from these furry volunteers and their handlers provide patients with a welcome distraction from illness and help them feel more relaxed.

Becoming a volunteer for JourneyCare, doing pet therapy, has been a high point in my life.

Like My Uncle Ed

JourneyCare volunteer Steve Crews was a lifelong writer and communicator. He worked as a reporter with the Chicago Tribune, deputy press secretary with former Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne, an executive with two international public relations firms, and head of communications with Hallmark Cards and later, with Alberto Culver Corp. He was an Army vet, married and the father of two.

Steve was a much beloved JourneyCare volunteer who was always willing to do anything we asked of him. He was a patient care volunteer, a reception volunteer at two different desks on two different days, sat on our Veterans’ Advisory Council, helped at community health fairs and wrote numerous posts for our JourneyCare blog.

Steve died in November in our care, with friends and family nearby.

Below is the last piece Steve wrote for us, which his family is allowing us to share in his honor. 

He is greatly missed.

Like My Uncle Ed

When I die, I want to go like my uncle Ed, a quiet guy with a blue-collar job at a local newspaper and a love of fresh water fishing. He was a man who never got excited. Pleased? Impatient? Sure. He was not without emotion. But excited? Not that I ever saw. Still, sitting in his chair, sipping an Edelweiss beer and reading the paper, he was always in control. If a problem arose, he was the one who solved it.

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