A Brighter Holiday Season Because of You

A Brighter Holiday Season Because of You

Midwest CareCenter spearheaded two collection drives for those in need this holiday season and the response has been overwhelming. All week there has been a steady stream of volunteers, staff and friends coming in with their donations. They are coming to the aid of one of our patients whose family needed extra support over the holidays. The patient, a 21-year old mother of two children, died in our hospice this week.

Dying with Dignity

Dying with Dignity

The concept of dying with dignity is frequently in the news. The latest has been Brittany Maynard's wish to end her life. Brittany had the same brain tumor as my husband, Tom – a glioblastoma.

I understand Brittany's decision. The end game with this type of cancer is not pretty. Our family, however, took a different approach.

Tom's tumor presented itself in his spine. In the beginning, Tom had difficulty walking but the tumor quickly progressed, leaving him paralyzed in a matter of months. If you knew Tom, being immobile was not his style. He was that dad who played catch with our son and daughter and all the neighborhood kids. In the nicer months of the year, he had a regular, weekly tee time at a local golf course and tried to sneak in a couple of extra rounds of golf every week, too. He traveled with his job and we took some exceptional vacations. After living and caring for someone who is paralyzed, I have incredible empathy towards people who are confined to wheelchairs – it is not easy. But it would have been impossible if one of our neighbors hadn't made coming over every day to help me with Tom part of his daily routine.

Making Exceptional Care Possible

Making Exceptional Care Possible

We are so grateful to you, the friends who support us year-round in providing quality, end-of-life care for our community.

You help each of our patients and their families experience their best possible days by supporting services like charity care, pet therapy, massage and Reiki, music therapies and our Waud Family Healing Garden. Your help also allows us to serve as a community resource, offering public events like chaplaincy training and talks on veteran concerns at the end of life.

Committed to Veterans Year-Round

Sometimes you're given a chance in your work to do something that's completely a labor of love. That's what serving as Midwest CareCenter's We Honor Veterans coordinator is for me. As the granddaughter of a WW I Army Veteran and the daughter of a WW II Navy veteran, I learned early in life to respect unquestioning commitment to a cause, and a willingness to endure personal sacrifice for a "greater good." Because that's what is asked of―and delivered by―our nation's veterans.

I Don’t Have Time to Write a Blog Post

One aspect of working with the dying that doesn't get the attention that it deserves is self-care. In our modern world, there is every incentive to go faster and do more. When faced with actual, honest-to-goodness life and death circumstances, caregivers and families can quickly go off the deep end and over-work, over-commit, or over-extend.

The funny thing is that when we hear the words "self care," we generally know what we should do, but we tend to not do it because we don't have time – a clearer example of irony would be hard to find. We know we should take a break, or go for a walk, or not eat that piece of candy, or count to ten, or take a deep breath, or get at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise five days per week, or give 10 compliments per day, or have a regular spiritual practice, or have a creative outlet, or smile even when we feel like frowning. We know these things, but life (and especially death) get in the way of them.

Lightbearers

I used to joke that art was my therapy. Today, I no longer joke about it.

In August of 1995 I had a heart attack, cardiac arrest and near death experience. It serves as an inspiration for many of my works, making it clear that art is therapy. Art is also therapeutic to me because it is so different than the way I spend the vast majority of my time as a general internist physician. In that role, I must step outside of myself and relate to the experiences of others, even though my own inner life continues whether or not I am aware of it.

Helping Others in the Headlines

Helping Others in the Headlines

As we strive to serve our patients, their families and the community at-large, we host many events that are open to the public and try to make sure to let everyone know about them. Several of these events hosted by Midwest CareCenter have made headlines online and in print over the last few months.

Providing Comfort in Small and Big Ways

The thing I really like about my job is the opportunity to work in different settings and to meet a variety of people from all different backgrounds. Taking care of people at the end of life gives me a chance to make them feel good, almost like they felt when they were well enough to do things for themselves. Even a simple shave makes a man feel refreshed, better, and more comfortable.

As hospice care providers, we are often caring for people who are in pain or who cannot get comfortable and this is the challenge of this job. We need to consider options to minimize their distress. Some approaches that might work in other settings or for other people cannot always be used, and we need to be resourceful in how we assist these patients. All of us, in whatever discipline, think about this and do our part to help our patients find comfort in small and big ways.

Through my work, I have been especially surprised to meet new people or reconnect with people I've met or cared for in other settings. I find that the world seems increasingly smaller and I am connected with more people than I would have ever known through the care that I have provided. I never know who I might run into again.

The Season of Football Memories

The Season of Football Memories

My late husband, Tom, loved football. While Tom liked baseball―he was a die-hard Chicago Cubs fan―by August, the Cubs were almost always non-contenders, so it was time for the football season to begin. He really loved the Bears. In fact, according to him, the biggest fight in our marriage related to me cheering for the Packers and him cheering for the Bears. After that fight, I realized I loved him more than the Packers, so I became a Bears fan, too. And even though Tom has been dead for over five years, I still root for the Bears―much to the dismay of my Packer fan family.

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