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Book Review: When Breath Becomes Air

Book Review: When Breath Becomes Air

I read. And I write, but not nearly as much as I read. And sometimes I read books about dying. I recently read "When Breath Becomes Air" by Paul Kalanithi, which has been on The New York Times best seller list for several weeks. It is written by a neurosurgeon regarding his diagnosis with terminal lung cancer.

I flagged several lines in the book because they resonated with me. 

The first part of the book is a reflection on his life in the medical field.

· On page 80: “Learning to judge whose life could be saved, whose couldn’t be, and whose shouldn't be requires an unattainable prognostic ability.”

· On page 102: “How little do doctors understand the hells through which we put patients.”

It Always Seems Too Early

It Always Seems Too Early

Advance care planning is something I'm passionate about. As an Advanced Care Planning Advocate for JourneyCare, I am very lucky that my job allows me to do something I believe in so strongly.

An important part of my work is to bring focus to National Healthcare Decisions Day, which is approaching on April 16. This nationwide initiative exists to inspire, educate and empower you, as well as your healthcare providers, about the importance of advance care planning.

This year’s theme is “It Always Seems Too Early, Until It’s Too Late.” I have witnessed the truth of this slogan firsthand. 

Reaching Out a Hand

Make a difference: volunteer.

I know! We’ve all heard the platitudes. How the actions of one person can change someone’s life, their community, the world. Really? Let’s be honest, isn’t volunteering just something nice people do so they can feel good about helping? I mean, what impact does it really have?

In a word – enormous and invaluable. (Ok, I know that’s two words...)

Suffering Is Optional

Suffering Is Optional

In my family of origin, I saw illness from an early age. My sister is developmentally challenged and she also has severe epilepsy. My father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease when I was in my early 20s. This was a prolonged illness that took its toll over the last 20 years of his life. My whole life I witnessed my mother as the caregiver for my sister, and then later for my father. After my father passed, my husband and I found an excellent group home for my sister. We did this in hopes to give my mother a much-needed break from the role of caregiver, and to allow my sister to live as independently as she possibly could. Finally, I would have my mother back as her relaxed and fun-loving self. Finally, she would be free to have more enjoyment and freedom in her life!

Something unexpected occurred, however.

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