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Featured Articles

  • I Want To Share a Story...

    I Want To Share a Story...

    How often in our lives do we hear that line?...from a child who comes rushing in from play to share a story of a neighborhood adventure, an older relative who shares a special memory, or a colleague who has a tale to tell from the morning commute.

    Stories are the fabric of our lives; stories help JourneyCare share our mission about the patients and families we serve each day in their life journeys.

    Read more >

  • Love Between Best Friends

    Love Between Best Friends

    My mother's best girlfriend from childhood, Marge, told me that she met me for the first time when I was two days old, and I have memories of her throughout my childhood ― a calm, strong and loving presence; a true and steadfast friend to my mother.

    It is essential to our good health to have meaningful and rich friendships in our lives. According to Mayo Clinic’s article "Friendships: Enrich Your Life and Improve Your Health," meaningful friendships:
    • Increase your sense of belonging and purpose.
    • Boost your happiness and reduce your stress.
    • Improve your self-confidence and self-worth.
    • Help you cope with traumas, such as divorce, serious illness, job loss or the death of a loved one.

    Read more >

  • Exhale

    Exhale

    Exhale.

    It’s the last thing hospice patients do before they are discharged from service.

    Lilian, Mary, Emmett and so many more.

    As hospice nurses, we all have patients who have touched our hearts in profound ways.

    Many folks think hospice is a sad thing. It’s not though. The grief families experience comes from losing these beautiful souls and anticipating a world without their jokes, their laughter, and their wisdom gained from a lifetime of experience. It's not sad for me though ― each is a celebration of a life and the end of one soul's human experience. But hospice nurses experience the loss in some ways as well. We all have different ways to cope too.

    I meditate.

    Read more >

  • Little Mystery, Much Comfort

    Little Mystery, Much Comfort

    On a recent visit to Journeycare, we stood outside the doorway of a patient and asked the family if he wanted to visit with Mystery, one of our miniature therapy horses.

    We were told the patient really loves animals, but that they were uncertain whether he was prepared for it at this time. Encouraged to ask the patient himself, we walked into the room. The man slowly opened up his eyes.

    Read more >

  • Grief Is Hard Enough

    Grief Is Hard Enough

    In our fast-paced, success-based society, people often feel stigmatized for the need to seek out counseling support. There’s this expectation that people will “pull themselves up by the bootstraps,” and the desire for help is deemed a failure. Men in particular are taught early on to withhold their emotions, and those who remain stoic in the face of adversity are considered heroic. Although we each carry a unique perspective, there are certain universal experiences that alter the course of our lives and inevitably affect our way of thinking.

    Read more >

  • Book Review: When Breath Becomes Air

    Book Review: When Breath Becomes Air

    I read. And I write, but not nearly as much as I read. And sometimes I read books about dying. I recently read "When Breath Becomes Air" by Paul Kalanithi, which has been on The New York Times best seller list for several weeks. It is written by a neurosurgeon regarding his diagnosis with terminal lung cancer.

    I flagged several lines in the book because they resonated with me. 

    The first part of the book is a reflection on his life in the medical field.

    · On page 80: “Learning to judge whose life could be saved, whose couldn’t be, and whose shouldn't be requires an unattainable prognostic ability.”

    · On page 102: “How little do doctors understand the hells through which we put patients.”

    Read more >

Latest Posts

 

I Want To Share a Story...

I Want To Share a Story...

How often in our lives do we hear that line?...from a child who comes rushing in from play to share a story of a neighborhood adventure, an older relative who shares a special memory, or a colleague who has a tale to tell from the morning commute.

Stories are the fabric of our lives; stories help JourneyCare share our mission about the patients and families we serve each day in their life journeys.

Love Between Best Friends

Love Between Best Friends

My mother's best girlfriend from childhood, Marge, told me that she met me for the first time when I was two days old, and I have memories of her throughout my childhood ― a calm, strong and loving presence; a true and steadfast friend to my mother.

It is essential to our good health to have meaningful and rich friendships in our lives. According to Mayo Clinic’s article "Friendships: Enrich Your Life and Improve Your Health," meaningful friendships:
• Increase your sense of belonging and purpose.
• Boost your happiness and reduce your stress.
• Improve your self-confidence and self-worth.
• Help you cope with traumas, such as divorce, serious illness, job loss or the death of a loved one.

Exhale

Exhale

Exhale.

It’s the last thing hospice patients do before they are discharged from service.

Lilian, Mary, Emmett and so many more.

As hospice nurses, we all have patients who have touched our hearts in profound ways.

Many folks think hospice is a sad thing. It’s not though. The grief families experience comes from losing these beautiful souls and anticipating a world without their jokes, their laughter, and their wisdom gained from a lifetime of experience. It's not sad for me though ― each is a celebration of a life and the end of one soul's human experience. But hospice nurses experience the loss in some ways as well. We all have different ways to cope too.

I meditate.

Little Mystery, Much Comfort

On a recent visit to Journeycare, we stood outside the doorway of a patient and asked the family if he wanted to visit with Mystery, one of our miniature therapy horses.

We were told the patient really loves animals, but that they were uncertain whether he was prepared for it at this time. Encouraged to ask the patient himself, we walked into the room. The man slowly opened up his eyes.

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